Fig and Almond Kuchen

Fig and Almond Kuchen

Fig and Almond Kuchen

Note: this kuchen is based on Flo Braker’s recipe for Prune plum, fig and walnut kuchen. It isn’t the same, but it was a great springboard for what I came up with. I live in a household that seems to prefer almonds over walnuts. I suspect that I could have made this more like a frangipan tart by pouring in half the dough, adding a thin disc of marzipan, then pouring in the rest of the dough and adding the figs. As it is, this is possibly a little lighter than an actual kuchen (I subbed 2 eggs rather than 1 egg and 2 egg yolks, due to what I had).

Ingredients:

  • 12 fresh figs, stems removed and each fig quartered (this might work with dried. Have not tried it.)
  • 1 Cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 stick (about 4 oz) unsalted butter
  • 1/2 Cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 Cup brown sugar (packed)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 tsp almond extract
  • 2/3 Cup slivered almonds

Topping:

  • 1 Tbspn white granulated sugar
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ground ginger

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350-degrees and set rack in center of oven. Grease and flour a 9 x 2-inch round baking pan (I used a 9-inch round springform pan with great success) and insert a round of parchment paper in the bottom.

Mix the cake: Cream butter. Once butter is smooth, pour in white sugar then brown sugar in a steady stream. Continue beating until well-incorporated and slightly fluffy. Beat in eggs, then almond extract. If you want to, sift flour, salt and baking powder separately before adding. If you don’t want to, you can put half the flour in then mix the salt and baking powder in the mixing cup with the flour before adding in the rest. Add flour mixture slowly until it’s just combined.

Spread batter evenly in pan. Sprinkle almonds evenly over the batter.

Add figs, starting at edges of the pan, seed/flesh side up and skins against the batter, one next to the other in circles around the pan. After completing the circles, if any wedges remain, snugly fit them in where you can.

Topping: Combine sugar and spices in a small bowl and sprinkle it over the top of the fruit on the cake.

Bake for 60 minutes, until the portion of cake nearest the sides of the pan is puffy and golden brown and the center is set. (You will want to start checking after 55 minutes). If the center is liquid and soft, bake another 5 to 7 minutes. If it is firm and set, then remove it from the oven to a wire rack and set it aside to cool for about 1 hour.

Remove cake from pan (use a knife or spatula slowly around edge of cake to release the sides). Cover the cake with the wire cooling rack, invert the cake, life the pan then gently peel off and discard the paper liner. (Like I said — the second time I tried this I used the spring form pan and it was so much easier.) Place a serving plate on top of the cake and turn it right side up. Serve warm or at room temperature. (I’m storing my cake in the refrigerator, even though the original recipe said to store it at room temp under plastic wrap. I just live in a household with cat interference.)

Serves 12. (Yeah, right. I’d say this is closer to feeding 15.)

Different fruits might work with this recipe — slices of plum or fresh apricot. I’m thinking of making the next one then freezing it for Christmas, when I’ll be visiting family members without a fig tree.

8 Responses to “Fig and Almond Kuchen”


  1. 1 helenphillips September 26, 2008 at 3:55 pm

    This sounds great – I’ve never heard of ‘Kuchen’.
    Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment – having your own fig trees must be great!

  2. 2 wordtapestry September 26, 2008 at 4:04 pm

    Helen,
    It’s a German/Austrian word meaning
    really rich cake that will blow any diet you might have.

    Since I have fig trees, I’m always scouring the web for some interesting way to deal with them.

    Thanks for visiting back.

  3. 3 barbara September 26, 2008 at 10:18 pm

    No, definitely. It sounds really, really good.

    Yay, kuchen and other German food that is _not_ easy to find in the Southwest. We have a couple restaurants, but it usually requires more forethought than I have.

  4. 4 barbara September 26, 2008 at 10:20 pm

    It seems like it would be super for christmas or other fallish holidays.

  5. 5 wordtapestry September 26, 2008 at 11:58 pm

    Barb,
    Thanks for visiting. I think for Christmas this would just look much more impressive than it is. Well, that and having enough people to eat the dessert in one setting would be good too. Will have to find out about nut allergies, I suppose.

  6. 6 rethoryke September 27, 2008 at 12:44 pm

    Completely different topic here, but I’m on a machine without email. Look at http://www.monarchrad.com/custom.html for radiator cover options.

    Hysterical thing: they’re in Carlstadt.

  7. 7 magnusmog September 27, 2008 at 3:25 pm

    tasty stuff, I wouldn’t let the cat have any either !

  8. 8 wordtapestry September 27, 2008 at 4:56 pm

    The cats haven’t a chance….
    Although one is trying to break the refrigerator seal with his laser beam eyes. (He wants the shrimp on sugarcane I got in takeout last night.)


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