Archive for the 'rambling' Category

Chaos

So… There’s been a lot happening. Which seems like the understatement of the century.  I’m heartsick: I love my country, and the best I can do here is focus on art. So, I’m going to review work I did in 2016, when I didn’t feel blocked by a wave of news items… It seems like now is the best time to get back in the writing habit. Working on a follow-up for “Bit by the Printer’s Devil“. Some camera downloads need to happen first, though.

Postcards

I have postcards all around my office. Some of them are antique, framed ones, showing photos of places that were near a camp I used to be a counselor at. Others are of bookish things from the British Isles. Still others are art postcards, bought when a local artist’s work delighted me, or a museum had a postcard of a particularly meaningful painting. I’m in the process of making more room in my office, and find that I’ll need to have a postcard framing and hanging afternoon, hopefully when it’s icky outside.

Artists whose postcards I’ve collected:

Martha Dougherty is a contemporary artist who does lovely watercolors set in Baltimore, Maryland — both interior views and external street scenes. Truly lovely. Here’s another one [Madison at Charles Street]. In some of the saturated street scenes, she’s the artist whose work is the closest reflections of the way I see color in landscapes. Very interesting. Linda Hall is another contemporary artist who does watercolors in Chestertown, Maryland.

So, have you collected postcards? If so, are they just mementos of places you’ve been, scenery you love, mail you received from loved ones, or affordable art?

 

 

Spring driving

When winter is nearly over, and spring is starting to bloom or leaf out, I like to vary my commutes so I can take advantage of the sunshine and see a bit of the countryside before I head back to the city. This evening I drove through the hilly valleys where there are state parks and many, many farms with white farmhouses. Some homes had bunting on their gates for St. Patrick’s Day (not sure that was the goal, or it’s a reference to Easter?). A few have egg trees, one house has a northern magnolia in bloom and another has very early forsythia.

And in one place, near where a creek bed snakes along the road, and there’s a small pond, I could hear the spring peepers. I talked about them last year too. Their song is one of the mysterious gifts given to us living on the east coast of the USA. I’ve heard them up in Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and Vermont. As a city dweller, when I hear them, I’m enchanted. People who live near them during the entire spring peeper mating season may have different reactions, since they can get quite loud.

In my yard, I have an egg tree set up (plastic eggs hung by wire from a miniature magnolia), and underneath it there are mini daffodils and crocuses blooming. Truly lovely. Maybe we’ll have a day without fog and rain when I can take a picture.

So, any detours that invite you when springtime arrives? Or are you more likely to do small auto trips in autumn, to enjoy the cooler weather? It will be cold again by the weekend, so I’m trying to soak up as much sunshine and warmth as I can before then.

 

Countdown to a blue moon

Step outside at sunset on July 31st, and this will finally be a full, blue moon [NASA explanation here].

countdownbluemoon

But right now we’re just counting down (and maybe humming along to the Nancy Griffith song, Just Once in a Very Blue Moon, although that might just be me (possibly better sound here)).  And admiring the daisies in the neighbor’s lawn, as well as black-eyed susans by garden gates. Hopefully, if you are dealing with summer’s hot weather and grass allergies, you have beautiful flowers to enjoy in the early evening.

daisies

Very little sleep to be had in Charm City

The Gardener and I spent all evening watching news reports from the east side of town and the west side of town. I’ve been calling family members to let them know I was stuck in a traffic jam tonight, but nothing worse. I’m heartbroken by what led up to the need to protest, saddened that the peaceful protests changed so drastically, and angry that a family who lost their son hasn’t been given the time to grieve. I recognize that it’s complicated…. too complicated for this little blog.

Businesses have been looted, a retirement home (in process of being built) has gone up in flames… the City has put in place a curfew for everyone starting tomorrow… and the National Guard has been called in. The local news media has been providing nuanced reporting (if I look at the national coverage, it seems very oddly skewed). We’ve had a news reporter seeded in with the local chaplains walking towards where the violence was coming from (modern cell phones are wonderful), information about what the smoke in the city was from, and good coverage of which roads were blocked.

Hopefully things will quiet down, so we can have a decent discussion and demand that justice be done. And this blog can go back to what it’s supposed to be — a place where news events don’t intrude so much.

Spring has sprung

There are slow motions toward spring cleaning. Emphasis on the “slow”.

It’s hard to work up enthusiasm for cleaning while the outdoors is so beautiful….

Blooms at the arboretum

Blooms at the arboretum

We went to the US National Arboretum last weekend, before the weather turned cold again. There were so many people hiking, basking in the sun, and taking photos. The azalea gardens are a great draw, and they have already started.

We did not see the latest attraction — the bald eagle’s nest — because the roads were closed off to pedestrians and cars, to protect the new pair. It’s been about 70 years since there was a nest at the arboretum, so they’re being quite thorough (including volunteers guarding the roadways to keep us tourists out).

The bees made up for no sightings of eagles on wing. I caught a photo bee-2015-natlarboretumof one in the ornamental quince bush in the Chinese gardens.

The hellebores of Cylburn Arboretum are blooming

Lovely things…

Hellebores in the small garden, underneath evergreens

Hellebores in the small garden, underneath evergreens

Yes, the day was a little bit chilly and windy. But we got out of the house, got to sniff the blooming witch hazel, and searched for crocuses and snowdrops in the grass. If you’re in the northern hemisphere, I hope winter is easing a bit for you, and you get to see some of the excitement of spring soon.


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